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    Natural regeneration for sustainable development

    By Alvaro Silva Iribarrem, researcher in the IIASA Ecosystems Services and Management Program.   Restoration of degraded ecosystems is an exciting and relatively new way of looking into the conservation of natural capital—the world’s natural assets, including soil, air, water, and all living things. For one, the success of restoration is

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    Tree islands for tropical forest restoration: the outlook is rosy after 10 years

    By Karen Holl, Leighton Reid, and Zak Zahawi Over the past few years there have been a growing number of commitments at the global, national and regional scale to restore forests because of their importance to conserve biodiversity, sequester carbon, reduce erosion, and provide goods and services to people. For

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    Thinning – the restoration middle road

    by Rhett Harrison, World Agroforestry Centre, Zambia When many people think about restoration, they envisage tree planting. Indeed, among a large segment of society tree planting is virtually synonymous with restoration, although with the obvious provisos that it should be with native species. However, the costs of planting are high

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    Gone with the wind: canopies of next generation tropical forests will function differently based on today’s understory recruitment

    By Jarrah Dominic Wills Diverse understory development within forest plantations can provide conservation value in highly modified tropical landscapes, but how many species should be used to establish a initial canopy structure to encourage recruitment: one species, two species, or more? And how does the quality of the understorey environment

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    Epiphyte restoration in Brazil’s Atlantic Forest

    CCSD restoration ecologist and PARTNERS member Leighton Reid spent 10 days collaborating with scientists and students in the Tropical Silviculture Lab (LASTROP) at the University of São Paulo. Epiphytes were a central theme of the visit. Vascular epiphytes are plants that live non-parasitically on other plants. Readers from the tropics

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