• A new model to scale up forest restoration from sites to landscapes

    T. Trevor Caughlin Restoring forest to hundreds of millions of hectares of degraded land has become a centerpiece of international plans to sequester carbon and conserve biodiversity. To achieve these ambitious restoration goals, we will need to predict restoration outcomes at landscape and regional scales. However, ecological field studies reveal widely divergent forest recovery rates, […]

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  • Landscape attributes determine restoration outcomes in the Ecuadorian Andes

    By Romaike S. Middendorp Landscape attributes can determine reforestation rates and, ultimately, the biodiversity and ecosystem service benefits of second-growth forests. Ecologists recognize the importance of landscape-scale variation, including distance to forest remnants, local forest cover, and heterogeneity of land cover, for reforestation. Policymakers increasingly develop plans for forest restoration at landscape scales. But the […]

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  • Biodiversity plantings speed up forest recovery in Australian rainforests

    By T. Trevor Caughlin, Literature Coordinator A fundamental choice for tropical reforestation projects is whether to plant trees or rely on natural regeneration to restore tree cover and other ecological properties. Both methods have costs; natural regeneration can be slow and unpredictable, while tree planting can be considerably more expensive and labor-intensive. As the demand […]

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